Albert Pick Liberty Black Orange Stripe Restaurant Dinner Plates

Albert Pick Liberty Black Orange Stripe Restaurant Dinner Plates
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  • Item #: APLOB040313
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Vintage From Paul is pleased to offer these Albert Pick Liberty Black Orange Stripe Restaurant Dinner Plates.

The Albert Pick Liberty Black Orange Stripe Restaurant Dinner Plates are restaurant ware quality known commonly as vitrified china. They are heavy and very durable (that is why they are used in hotels, restaurants, railroad dining cars, etc.).

The Albert Pick Liberty Black Orange Stripe Restaurant Dinner Plates have a pristine white body accented with on off the rim black stripe and a smaller orange and black at the inner verge.

Each of the available Albert Pick Liberty Black Orange Stripe Restaurant Dinner Plates is in pristine conditionand appear to be unused.

The Albert Pick Liberty Black Orange Stripe Restaurant Dinner Plates measure 9-1/8 inches in diameter.

The Albert Pick Liberty Black Orange Stripe Restaurant Dinner Plates are marked with "Liberty Vitrified China, Albert Pick Co. Inc., Chicago, Illinois, DE McNichol, Clarksburg W.Va.".

We ship the day after payment is received using Insured Priority Mail with Delivery Confirmation. Depending upon your location, items are received in 2-4 days.

About Albert Pick

Young Pick found employment as a clerk with the Austrian consulate, but soon saw that there could be a market for Austrian china and glassware in Chicago’s hotels and restaurants. He became an importer, and in 1857 he found the Albert Pick Company, located in a four story frame building on Randolph Street, near Franklin Street.

In 1871, everything changed. The Albert Pick Co. was wiped out by the great Chicago fire. But, like the mythological Phoenix, the Picks literally arose from their own ashes and started over again. Charles eventually bought the business from his older brother, and, in 1884, Albert left school at 15 to work for his father.

Eight years later, Albert married, and in that same year of 1892, he, in turn, bought the business from his father.

Over the next 30 years, Albert Pick built up the business to the point where it became known as the largest hotel equipment house in the country. He was also instrumental in organizing, financing, and promoting numerous hotel operations, and helped a number of other future hotel barons get started.

 In 1926, the Albert Pick Co. was sold to a group of New York investment bankers and became known as Albert Pick Co., Inc. At the same time, Albert, together with his brother, brother in law, and son (Albert Pick Jr.) organized a chain of seven hotels into the Pick Hotels Corporation.

Albert Pick died in 1955, but Albert Pick Jr. had, in the meantime, become president of the hotel chain.

By 1957, when the family celebrated its 100th anniversary, it was the third largest hotel chain in the U.S., and prospects for continuation of the Albert Pick dynasty looked good as Albert Pick III announced plans for carrying on the family business as soon as his military service was completed.

But, it was not to be. The Pick Hotels Corporation went out of business in the 1960s, probably due to finding themselves saddled with aging hotels located in downtown areas (such as the company’s flagship hotel, the Congress  in Chicago) as the emphasis rabidly shifted to motels located outside of city centers.

 The company had actually already seen the writing on the wall and become the first major hotel chain to enter the motel field on a large scale in the late 1950s. It boasted eight motels located in seven different states, but it couldn’t compete with such burgeoning giants as Best Western and Holiday Inn. The Bass family bought part of the Pick chain to put with their Americana chain. Despite 100 years, the Albert Pick hotels disappeared in the twinkling of an eye

 

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